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    Nevada receives donation of more than 12,000 acres for a new state park along the Walker River

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Spring Valley

State Park

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About Spring Valley

Volcanic tuff and sediment give Spring Valley State Park a beautiful light-gray, pink and white backdrop. A popular area for boating, swimming and camping, the park also allows visitors the opportunity to tour historic ranches built in the late 1800s. The 59-acre Eagle Valley Reservoir offers fisherman an opportunity to catch rainbow, tiger and German brown trout, and attracts an array of waterfowl and shore birds, including mallards, herons, avocets and the infrequent, yet beautiful, trumpeter swan. Campers and hikers share the canyons and valleys with soaring eagles, hawks and songbirds.

Park Detail

FACILITIES & AMENITIES

Camping: Horsethief Gulch Campground, the main campground, is located just west of Eagle Valley Reservoir. It has 37 campsites, each with table, grill and shade ramada, as well as three restrooms, two with showers. Water is also available. Ranch Campground is located two miles north of the main campground. This facility has seven campsites with tables and grills. Water and primitive restrooms are available. The camping limit is seven days in a 30-day period.

Group Area: Day and overnight groups are accommodated at the south end of the reservoir. Reservations should be made in advance.

Picnicking/Day Use: The day use picnic area is located next to the boat launch at the reservoir. It includes eight picnic sites, each with table and grill, a restroom and a fish cleaning station.

Boat Launch: A boat launch is located on the south shore of the reservoir adjacent to the day use picnic areas. A ramp, dock and temporary docking slips are available.

Eagle Valley Reservoir: Eagle Valley Reservoir is the primary attraction at Spring Valley State Park. The 65-acre reservoir is currently managed as a put-and-take sport fishery. Rainbow trout is the primary species.

Hiking: A developed trail connects the Stone Cabin and Ranch Campground. Walks around the reservoir are popular and allow terrific views of the valley.

Programs: Information about program scheduling may be obtained from either park staff or kiosks. Upon request, special presentations can be arranged for groups.

Hours: Open seven days a week, 365 days a year.


FIELD NOTES

  • No operating of ATVs in the park boundaries. All vehicle operators must be licensed. Drive only on designated roadways.
  • Camping is allowed only in designated areas. Saving or reserving campsites is prohibited, even if pre-paid.
  • Fires are permitted only in the fire rings and grills provided. Collection of fire wood within the park is prohibited.
  • Removing, disturbing or damaging any historic structure, artifact, rock, plant life, fossil or other feature is prohibited. State and federal laws protect this area and its resources.
  • Pets are welcome, but they must be kept on a leash of not more than six feet in length.
  • Use garbage dumpsters provided. Do not burn or bury garbage.
  • Quiet hours in the park are from 10 p.m. - 7 a.m.
  • Visitors are responsible for knowing all park rules and regulations in effect. Detailed rules and regulations are posted at the park or may be obtained from any Park Ranger.
  • Those with developmental and/or physical limitations are invited to enjoy all of the recreational activities of Nevada State Parks. If you would like to request additional support or accommodations, please call Nevada State Parks at (775) 684-2770. We continually seek ways to provide recreational opportunities for people of all abilities and welcome any suggestions you may have.
  • View a list of frequently asked questions.

NATURAL RESOURCES/CLIMATE

Although part of the Colorado River watershed, the park's environment is typical of the Great Basin desert and riparian life zones. The reservoir attracts a variety of waterfowl and shore birds, including mallards, teals, herons, avocets and the infrequent, yet beautiful, trumpeter swan. Eagles, hawks, songbirds, ravens and road runners inhabit the canyons and valleys. (READ MORE)


HISTORY OF SPRING VALLEY STATE PARK – Established in 1969

Archaeologists believe the area was occupied as long ago as 5,500 B.C.E. The large rock outcrop near the center of the valley, known to many as George Washington Rock, may have also been used as a lookout for these inhabitants. (READ MORE)

Park Fees

Nevada residents get a $2.00 park entrance discount

Day use entrance fee:  $7.00  per vehicle

Boat launch:  $10.00

Camping:  $17.00 per night

Camp and boat:  $20.00 per night

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