University professor speaks about literature in Carson Valley on June 19

cheryll and flappy 198x300 University professor speaks about literature in Carson Valley on June 19MINDEN, Nev. – University of Nevada Professor Cheryll Glotfelty will present her research on Nevada in literature at a free event at the Dangberg Home Ranch State Historic Park on Saturday, June 19, at 10:00 a.m.

Glotfelty’s talk will highlight the Silver State’s colorful literary heritage, from Native American oral tales to present-day fiction, memoir and poetry. Special attention will be devoted to stories about Carson Valley and the surrounding region.

Glotfelty is a professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno. Twelve years of research went into the making of her book, Literary Nevada: Writings from the Silver State (2008), a comprehensive anthology. She has won numerous teaching awards, including the Nevada Regents Distinguished Teaching Award and the CASE-Carnegie Nevada Professor of the Year award. Her appearance at the park is supported by Nevada Humanities, the National Endowment for the Humanities and NV Energy.

This free outdoor program is part of a series of speakers offered by Nevada State Parks at the Dangberg Home Ranch Historic Park. Chairs and shade shelters are provided. Visitors are welcome to bring lawn chairs and encouraged to bring drinking water. Pets are not allowed.

After the speaker, the public is invited to see the park’s exhibit, “Carson Valley History: A Community of Cousins,” immediately following the presentation. Exhibit admission is $3.00 for adults and is free for children under 13.

The park is located at 1450 Highway 88, one-half mile south of the Carson Valley Swim Center. A map and further information can be found at parks.nv.gov/hr.htm or by calling 775-783-9417.

The Dangberg Home Ranch Historic Park, located just west of Minden in Douglas County, features several historic buildings constructed between 1857 and 1920, including what was once one of the most prominent homes in Carson Valley. The site was settled in 1857 by Carson Valley pioneer Heinrich F. Dangberg Sr.