State Parks presenting new management alternatives for South Fork State Recreation Area July 18, 2007

southfork web State Parks presenting new management alternatives for South Fork State Recreation Area July 18, 2007

ELKO, Nev.–The Nevada Division of State Parks kicked off its new development planning for South Fork State Recreation Area in March. The division held two public meetings and public comment was paramount in developing the three alternatives that will be presented at the July 18 meeting.

The proposed alternatives to the existing park management include recommendations such as a new group-use area, reservoir loop trail and new campground.

South Fork is one of our top priorities and we are inviting the public to attend and provide input into the park’s future development and operations, said Dave Morrow, administrator of the Nevada Division of State Parks. The existing master plan is more than 20 years old and was written in anticipation of the reservoir. Elko County has had significant increases in population and recreation use has changed radically. The new master plan needs to reflect those changes.

The division will present three management alternatives at the public meeting on July 18, 2007. There will be a presentation beginning at 6:30 pm followed by a public comment period and open house.

The South Fork State Recreation Area covers 1,650 acres and is surrounded by 2,200 acres of wildlife-filled meadow lands and rolling hills. It is popular for hunting, camping, boating, picnicking, winter sports and wildlife viewing. The park is best known for its trophy-class trout and bass fishery. Facilities include a boat launch, campground, trailer dump station and picnic area. South Fork is 16 miles south of Elko, Nevada on State Route 228.

The Nevada Division of State Parks plans, develops and maintains a system of parks and recreation areas for the use and enjoyment of more than 2.3 million visitors a year. The division was established in 1963 by the Nevada Legislature to form a new state park agency within the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. The division manages and maintains 24 parks in Nevada.